2014 City Council Election: Ward 4 – Etobicoke Centre

The Incumbent:

Gloria Lindsay Luby

The Race

Councillor Gloria Lindsay-Luby is not running for re-election this year after serving as an Etobicoke City Councillor since 1985. This leaves Ward 4 with big shoes to fill and there are many good options in this list of candidates. Across the board, candidates are concerned with aging infrastructure in Etobicoke and intensification of condo developments. Good to note wide support for alternate service delivery.

Candidates Who Did Not Participate: John Campbell, Rosemarie Mulhall, William Murdoch, Adam Slobodian

The Breakdown

  • Candidate Response
    Carnevale, Angelo No
    Christensen, Niels Yes
    Chun, Tony Yes
    Magno, Mario Yes
    Stockwell, Chris Yes
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar Yes


  • Candidate Response
    Carnevale, Angelo Alternate service delivery for services such as administration, garbage collection east of Yonge St., and cutting the size of Council.
    Christensen, Niels Savings in the police department.
    Chun, Tony Everywhere, but fire and police departments specifically
    Magno, Mario 10% cut across all departments.
    Stockwell, Chris Privatize non-essential services. Review of middle management staff. Comprehensive review of services provided by the city to assess use by public.
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar Expenditures must be analyzed in detail


  • Candidate Response
    Carnevale, Angelo Yes
    Christensen, Niels Yes
    Magno, Mario Yes
    Chun, Tony No
    Stockwell, Chris Yes
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar Yes


  • Candidate Response
    Carnevale, Angelo Yes, also road repair services
    Christensen, Niels Yes
    Chun, Tony Yes, also park maintenance
    Magno, Mario Yes
    Stockwell, Chris Yes, also IT services, administrative services, and any other non-essential service.
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar Yes


  • Candidate Response
    Carnevale, Angelo Yes to elimination
    Christensen, Niels Yes to reforming the tax
    Chun, Tony Yes to elimination
    Magno, Mario Will consider phasing out
    Stockwell, Chris Yes to reducing
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar Yes to modifying


  • Candidate Response
    Carnevale, Angelo Offer incentives for small business to expand – property tax credits linked to job growth. Greater support to Business Improvement Areas across the city.
    Christensen, Niels Lower business and industrial tax rates
    Chun, Tony Low taxes, good infrastructure, easy access to Island Airport.
    Magno, Mario Encourage job creation through skilled trades program.
    Stockwell, Chris Competitive business property tax rate, reduce red tape in public service, competitive, educated workforce.
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar Better education in schools and better training for workers.


  • Candidate Response
    Carnevale, Angelo In the short term, more buses. In the long term, subway expansion.
    Christensen, Niels Restore cancelled bus service in Etobicoke. Halt the proposed cancellation of the seniors' community bus in Etobicoke. Eglinton Crosstown should be underground. Against road tolls.
    Chun, Tony Elected officials must show leadership and vision when guiding the transit process.
    Magno, Mario All levels of government must be involved to create a steady, long-term funding plan.
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar Build subways with commitments from provincial and federal governments.


  • Candidate Response
    Carnevale, Angelo Negotiate within parameters of budget.
    Christensen, Niels Negotiate to hold the lines on taxes at inflation.
    Chun, Tony Assemble the best possible team of negotiators
    Magno, Mario Fair wages without affecting the quality of service.
    Stockwell, Chris Be resolute in sticking to a policy position when negotiating with unions. Substituting pensions and benefits instead of a pay hike does not produce real savings.
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar Groups that blackmail the system should not be benefitted.


  • Candidate Response
    Christensen, Niels Will consider but using P3s at the City's 311 centre is a start.
    Chun, Tony Would prefer contracting out as opposed to P3s
    Magno, Mario Yes, for example, land rights over subway stations
    Stockwell, Chris Yes, for example, air rights over subway stations and in social housing
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar Yes, for example, in building subways and extension of the Gardiner


  • Candidate Response
    Carnevale, Angelo Crumbling city infrastructure linked to the damage from flooding. A community centre for seniors. Increased communication with local representatives.
    Christensen, Niels Intensification that is poorly planned. There needs to be a complete overhaul of the OMB. Local residents need to be respected over planners and developers.
    Chun, Tony Stopping above ground LRT on Eglinton Ave.
    Magno, Mario Aging infrastructure that requires immediate action. Better management of road repairs.
    Stockwell, Chris Public transportation. Lack of community consultation with development projects. Do not reduce number of front-line police officers.
    Vidal-Calvet, Oscar A new seniors home and youth community centre

 

The full responses

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    In principle, a property tax cap appears to be a great way to keep a lid on the size of property tax increases, but unfortunately at this point, it is not realistic. The first approach should be to look for ways the city can deliver the services people rely on both efficiently and economically. Once all those options have been implemented, then looking for ways to keep tax increases as low as possible can be put into practice.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    There are many ways in which the city can find savings within the current budget, including finding alternative delivery options for some services. This could include contracting out some administration services, as well as garbage collection east of Yonge Street. Contracting out garbage collection in the west end of the city has resulted in both improved service and cost savings for the city. Another way to realize savings without having a negative impact on residents is to reduce the size of council.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    I support reducing the size of city council to half its current size. A smaller council will make for a more efficient council and save money. It will mean that the work will be distributed amongst a smaller council. Each council member would then be more accountable, and with accountability, comes efficiency.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Yes I support contracting out garbage pick-up east of Yonge.
    I would also support the idea of contracting out road repair services.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    I support both the reduction, and eventual elimination, of the land transfer tax. The land transfer tax is an unfair tax which has been placed on the backs of Toronto property owners. This is a punitive tax which is especially unfair to those who cannot afford to pay more in taxes. To ensure that Toronto remains an attractive place to live, we have to look at alternative methods of obtaining tax dollars, and not simply burdening home owners and buyers.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    Toronto’s unemployment rate, like the unemployment rate in Ontario is high. To create more jobs, we need to invest more in small business growth. We can consider offering incentive programs making it easier for small businesses to hire and expand. Other areas that might be worth exploring would include offer greater support to the Business Improvement Associations across the city or perhaps offer property tax credits to small businesses and linking them to job growth.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    In the long term, I support subway expansion. Great cities around the world have efficient and well-serviced subway systems and that’s what we need here in Toronto. In the short term, I support adding more buses to relieve traffic congestion in the downtown core, rather than streetcars.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    Naturally, I believe in fair wages and working conditions for city workers. I also believe that in order to get the best deal for the city, we have to be mindful of our budget and negotiate within that. The city’s goal should be to pay its bills without running a deficit.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    There are many opportunities for public/private partnerships. Toronto’s proposed subway expansion is a perfect situation in which to engage this discussion. Securing partnerships with developers so that they are required to pay for part of the subway in the location of their new buildings will go a long way to both having the subway expansion built and having that necessary infrastructure continue to grow as it is needed.

    Many of our swimming pools, libraries, parks and skating rinks need funding for maintenance and revitalization. Partnering with corporate sponsors will help pay the costs. A current great example of public and private co-operation is Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment currently building, and paying for, a practice facility at Downsview Park. The public can use the space when it is not in use by MLSE.

    A local example in Ward 4 is Silver Creek Park which is in need of revitalization. So far, the funding for this project is coming from door-to-door donations as well as City contributions. A corporate partnership would be a great boost to the effort. The city should set up a program with corporate Toronto to help pay for these types of projects.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    Right now, the biggest issues I hear at the doors are the deterioration of our roads and flooding in the ward. It is my view that these two issues are directly connected. Crumbling city infrastructure, including our roads, contributes to some of the flooding.

    We have to direct tax dollars to fix roads. With proper grading, it will help to alleviate flooding issues, as well as to ease some of the traffic congestion in the Ward.

    Another concern I regularly hear from Ward 4 residents is a general lack of trust of politicians. I want to rebuild that trust through better communication. My plan is to be the link between Ward 4 and City Hall. Within the first six months of being elected, I will mail out a newsletter to all residents in the Ward, asking them their communication preference- email or regular mail.. I will regularly produce newsletters with updates pertaining to City Hall and Ward 4 issues and will send them out to every household in the ward according to their indicated preference.

    Currently, there is no community centre in Ward 4 for seniors. I commit to finding a way to ensure seniors programs are available in Ward 4, including investigating the possibility of using available library space to create a centre for seniors.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Ideally taxes should be frozen, but a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation is a good compromise.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    I am a former Police Officer and understand the culture of policing.  I know there are significant savings to be found in the Police budget that will not affect front line policing.  When I volunteered as Community Police Liaison Committee Chair for 22 Division, I oversaw the successful amalgamation of 21 and 22 Divisions.  This action saved millions long-term, but there is a lot more work to be done that has been ignored for too long.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    I will support reducing the size of Toronto City Council, but I must be assured the politicians will not be simply replaced by unelected staff and bureaucrats.  During the Humbertown fight, we relied on the politicians to listen to our community but staff were not as receptive to our concerns.  City Hall cannot be run by the unelected and the unaccountable.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    I will support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street.  Obviously contracting out garbage collection west of Yonge has proven successful, but there must be a way of phasing out current employees through attrition without high “buy out” costs.  There should be an entire review of alternative service deliveries by looking at contracting out services throughout the City.  Identifying the best service at the best cost is common sense.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    As a Real Estate Broker I know first hand the MLTT is a poor tax and should be eliminated.  This is unlikely to happen because the revenue from the tax cannot be replaced without a significant property tax hike.  At the very minimum the MLTT should be reformed by factoring inflation annually to index the rates.  Right now a systematic increase of the Land Transfer Tax increases annually as property values increase.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    Municipal governments cannot do a lot to create job growth unless they go on a massive hiring and spending spree, which I do not recommend or support.  We can, however, make Toronto an attractive destination for business by addressing the high business and industrial tax rates.  We also have to ensure there is adequate planning and protection for our industrial and commercial lands from residential redevelopment as people still need places to work.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    Etobicoke has been left out of the City’s Transit Strategy for far too long. Before any expansion we need to restore the cancelled bus service hours especially on Royal York, Islington, Kipling, Dundas, and Eglinton. The TTC is also considering a cancellation of the senior’s community bus in Central Etobicoke, and if elected I am going to try to stop them. When the Eglinton Crosstown finally comes through Etobicoke, it should be underground and not interfere with existing traffic. Unlike one of my opponents, I don’t believe road tolls or parking taxes to pay for expanded transit is a fair request for people from Etobicoke. Etobians will pay the majority of the tolls and get none of the benefits as the transit projects will be directed to Scaborough and Downtown. If Etobicoke is asked to pay, we should receive some of the benefits and be a part of the plan.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    My advice is to get the best deal possible knowing this Council will hold the line on taxes at inflation.  Be prepared to stand firm and deliver. Previous Collective Agreements need to be reviewed and dealt with considering present day reality.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    There is an opportunity for a public-private partnership with the City’s 311 call centre that could be explored.  The onus should be on the private sector to prove that such an arrangement is beneficial to taxpayers first.  I am not willing to enter into any P3s unless taxpayers get a deal that benefits them.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    Intensification. For the past four years, I have spent thousands of hours fighting the Humbertown application in my community. Neighbourhoods in Etobicoke are increasingly under siege from high-intensification development and being turned into versions of downtown Toronto – all as a result of the Mixed Use designations the city is applying to neighbourhoods. We are not only seeing poor planning at Humbertown, we are seeing it across Ward 4 and I expect to see similar applications at Richview Plaza, Wincott Plaza, Royal York Plaza and along Dundas and Eglinton. The current planning process is deeply flawed and it needs significant change, including a complete overhaul of the OMB. The process should be local and a significant voice must be had by the community and residents who are deeply affected by these developments. I am going to work hard to change the process and put residents first, not planners and developers.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Yes.  This will allow City to have authority in demanding salaries and pension of City employees to be pegged to inflation as well.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    Everywhere, including Police and Fire Departments.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    Current size of Toronto City Council seems reasonable for size of City it serves.  At times, council seems messy but democracy is messy.  Smaller size council will concentrate power and maybe more susceptible to corruption.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Yes.  My experience of private garbage collection has been good.  Other services can be considered for contracting out such as park maintenance.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    I would like to see Municipal Land Transfer Tax eliminated.  Toronto does not have revenue problem.  Toronto has spending problem.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    Government does not create jobs.  However, government can create environment to attract businesses to Toronto.  This means good infrastructure and low taxes.  Easy access to Island Airport will be great plus for business travelers.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    Major transit projects for largest city in Nation is a priority for all levels of government.  Mayors Office and City Council must show leadership and vision to guide transit planning process.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    City’s negotiating team should always try to get best deal for taxpayers.  However, this has not always been the case.  It is important to assemble best possible negotiators who can achieve fair deal for both labour and tax payers.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    I would prefer to see contracting out oppose to public-private partnerships.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    Possible LRT on Eglinton Avenue west of Jane.  Eglinton Avenue West is an exit and entry point to 401, 427, 27, 403 and 410.  Take away two lanes and it will be unbearable. LRT must be stopped.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Yes, would be my easy answer.  Realistically, future situations may demand that we reconsider our revenue sources to alleviate higher costs for services.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    I believe each department can save at least 10% on their budget.  Trimming 10% on a 1 billion dollar budget should provide a considerable savings for the current city budget. Budget reduction has been a proven business strategy ensuring that the cost of doing business does not affect the level of service or cost to the  consumer, or in this case, the residents of Toronto.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    I believe we should align our current city ward boundaries to more closely reflect that of the federal/ provincial boundaries, thus reducing the size of Toronto City Council.  This would create a more efficient and streamlined council that can maintain honoring the needs of different areas within the city while still ensuring that there was a greater opportunity for consensus.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    I fully support the decision the previous council made to contract out garbage collection, and would support it’s expansion.  Any services that can be contracted out resulting in cost savings for Toronto, without affecting the quality of service, deserves significant consideration.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    The City of Toronto currently needs the revenues from the Land Transfer tax.  A phase out is something that we should consider, however reducing it at this time is a more reasonable course of action than outright and immediate elimination.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    We made a mistake by downplaying the importance of trades in our culture. I believe getting youth into trades at the high school level is something that all levels of government should be invested in.  As a business owner from the skills trade, I will support all initiatives to help create jobs through the skills trade program.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    The transit plan that the previous City Council passed should not be up for debate.  I believe all three levels of government must be involved to secure a steady long term funding plan, which will include not only Toronto but all other cities within the GTA. I would advocate for keeping the currently approved plan.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    I believe negotiating fair wages, without interrupting the quality of service that the City of Toronto has come to expect, must be part of the mandate for the city’s negotiating team.  I also believe that the City of Toronto cannot afford to be dictated to by the big unions.  A fair deal must be fair for both sides respecting the needs of the organization along with their workers.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    I believe that public-private partnerships are a great way to grow the city.  A simple way that was considered last term that was not expanded on is to sell or lease the land rights over future TTC subway stations.  I feel if the city could expand programs such as this we would have a significant opportunity to generate considerable revenue without the full expense of the development costs.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    Ward 4, like the rest of Toronto is dealing with an aging infrastructure that requires immediate action. This needs to be a top priority for Etobicoke. Unfortunately, with action does come some level of inconvenience.  Recently Kipling Avenue had one lane closed in each direction from Dixon to North of Burnhamthorpe.  As I drove by three or four times a day I saw the road was closed but there are no workers present. Traffic was affected in this area for over a week without cause.  Regardless of how Torontonians get around, they need access to major roadways even during times of repair. Infrastructure projects need to be managed in a way that maximizes repairs during non-peak times, and facilitates traffic flow in peak times. Ward 4 residents are tired of the mismanaged, over-budget, never-ending projects coming from City Hall.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Yes

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    Firstly, I believe that we can find cost-savings by privatizing non-essential services. I believe certain services can be delivered at the same high quality levels with less cost to the taxpayer.

    Secondly, the reality is that the City is faced with an oversized bureaucracy. It is for this reason that I believe a review of middle management staff should be conducted to determine whether reductions can be implemented, while at the same time ensuring our current level of services will not be negatively impacted.

    Thirdly, a comprehensive review of services provided by the City should be undertaken to determine the necessity of these services including how much they are utilized by members of the public. Once we have this information, we can determine the best course of action.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    Yes, I support reducing the size of City Council, and yes, I believe it would improve how council operates.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Yes. City Council’s decision to privatize garbage collection has been a very successful policy that has saved millions of dollars for the people of Toronto. I believe we need to finish the job and privatize the other half of the City’s waste collection.

    It has always surprised me how our children can be bussed to and from school and that our sick can be transferred between hospitals, both by the private sector, but this is not an acceptable way to handle garbage collection for the City.

    This approach should also be expanded to include other City-managed departments including I.T., administrative services, and any other non-essential services in which savings can be realized.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    As Councillor, I would support a motion that would see a reduction or elimination of the Municipal Land Transfer Tax. However, I believe it may need to be a staged reduction, as I am NOT prepared to hike property taxes simply to eliminate the Municipal Land Transfer Tax.

    Reducing or eliminating the Municipal Land Transfer Tax is something that can be easily accomplished within Councils’ four-year mandate.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    Municipal governments do not create jobs nor are they supposed to. The role of any municipal government is to build the right environment that will enable the private sector to create jobs.

    In order assist the private sector and stimulate job creation, the City needs to ensure there is 1) a competitive business property tax rate, 2) a productive public service that works to reduce the amount of red tape that exists today, and 3) a competitive, educated workforce.

    It is a myth that governments create jobs by hiring people.  All this succeeds in doing is creating new taxes.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    Yes, the current transit planning process needs to change. The first thing we need to do is petition the provincial government to scale back the long and arduous environmental assessment process. Secondly, City Council must establish a plan, firmly commit to it, seek proper funding models from senior levels of government, and then stick to the plan.

    Transportation initiatives and decision making must also be streamlined so that decision making is not one endless deferral and referral process.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    Having served as Minister of Labour, I have learned one thing about labour negotiations: a strong and forceful policy position must be adopted and communicated to the city unions. Once you have established and communicated your position, you must be resolute in sticking to it. I believe the City is a fair employer, but I have never been confused by the fact that a Councillor represents the taxpayer and the union represents the employer.

    Supplementing pay hikes and replacing them with improved benefits and pension entitlements is not creating real savings.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    I am not opposed to P3s and I believe there are opportunities on the transit side, including air rights over subway stations, as well as in social housing, in which the City can provide the funding and the private sector builds and owns the brick and mortar.

    P3s are difficult to negotiate but certainly worthy to look at in greater detail

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    I believe public and vehicular transportation is the number one issue in every ward. This has been at the core of the Eglinton rapid transit improvements, and a concern for most Ward 4 residents.

    Infill development is also a very important issue. There is a need to organize and communicate with communities before development applications are too far down the road. The recent development proposal at Humber Town is an example of the importance of community consultation. There are many sites throughout Ward 4 that are similar to Humber Town that have the potential to be redeveloped. I believe it is the job of the Councillor to encourage stronger community consultation where infill development is concerned.

    We are lucky to live in a City in which crime rates are quite low compared to other jurisdictions in North America. However, this does not mean that we can afford to become complacent. We need to continue to ensure our streets are safe. It is for this reason, among many others, that I do not support reducing the number of front-line police officers.

    If I am elected as Councillor for Ward 4, I will be focused on ensuring that reducing crime is a key focus at City Hall.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    I do

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    Expenditures must be analyzed in detail.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    Yes, I think Toronto City Council should be no more than 22-23 this would be convenient and easier to agree in vital matters.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Yes, of course I would support contracting out garbage collection and other services which may represent savings and efficiency to tax payers.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    If Land transfer tax could not be totally deleted, I proposed this kind of taxes to be paid by the seller.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    To have and provide better education in schools and better training and skills for workers.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    Funding should be a commitment done together with the Provincial Government and also help of the Federal Government, we must think in a larger Metro / Subway system.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    We must think in a way to benefit the City of Toronto and not to groups or associations interested in black mailing the system in place.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    Yes, and one example would the building of the Subway, other would be the extension of the Gardener and a review of “The Spadina Expressway” project.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    Seniors home (in my personal opinion), and I would advocate for partnership in the building and administration of them and also would be a Youth Community Centre.

    I would ask you to review my Linkdin account for more extensive answer to the above questions.