2014 City Council Election: Ward 6 – Etobicoke-Lakeshore

The Incumbent:

Mark Grimes

The Race

We’re pleased to see almost all candidates from this race respond to our survey – with the exception of Councillor Mark Grimes. It would have been beneficial for voters to read his views but there are plenty of options to choose from here, and most espouse fiscally responsible ways forward for the ward. Of note, is the need for expanded transit and infrastructure in this growing community with new condo developments.

Candidates Who Did Not Participate: Councillor Mark Grimes

The Breakdown

  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ No
    James, Ruthmary Yes
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw Yes
    Laxer, Michael No
    Letonja, John Yes
    Moulder, Peggy Yes
    O'Callaghan, Sean Yes
    Searle, Dave Yes
    Sheppard, Everett Yes
    Sysak, Robert Yes
    Vella, Tony Yes


  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ Doubts there are any significant savings to be found.
    James, Ruthmary Councillor, Mayor, and city workers' salaries should be to the rate of inflation. Stop buying umbrellas to put in concrete at Queen's Quay.
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw A full review of operations is required to assess this question.
    Laxer, Michael Does not regard this as a priority.
    Letonja, John Will look into finding savings
    Moulder, Peggy Compare Toronto to NYC – Less staff positions in Planning Department, and the planning process is more streamlined, democratic, and efficient.
    O'Callaghan, Sean Cut back on non-essential items. A review of management structure to check for duplication of services. Companies awarded contracts must stay within price.
    Searle, Dave Prioritize transit funds over other services. Departments should receive lower compensation. Scrutinizing the large police service budget.
    Sheppard, Everett Office and counsellor expenses.
    Sysak, Robert Address the police budget.
    Vella, Tony Freeze councillor wages for a few years


  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ No
    James, Ruthmary No
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw Yes
    Laxer, Michael No
    Letonja, John Yes
    Moulder, Peggy Yes
    O'Callaghan, Sean Yes
    Searle, Dave No
    Sheppard, Everett Yes
    Sysak, Robert No
    Vella, Tony No


  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ No
    James, Ruthmary Yes
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw Yes
    Laxer, Michael No
    Letonja, John Yes
    Moulder, Peggy Will consider
    O'Callaghan, Sean Yes
    Searle, Dave Yes
    Sheppard, Everett Yes
    Sysak, Robert Yes
    Vella, Tony Yes


  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ No
    James, Ruthmary Yes to elimination
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw Yes to elimination
    Laxer, Michael No
    Letonja, John Yes to elimination
    Moulder, Peggy Yes to reducing
    O'Callaghan, Sean Yes to reducing
    Searle, Dave Will consider
    Sheppard, Everett Yes
    Sysak, Robert Yes to elimination
    Vella, Tony Yes to reducing


  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ Stop re-zoning industrial lands to residential. Gridlock is a major impediment to job growth.
    James, Ruthmary We need to get manufacturing back with the land that is still available. More high-tech jobs and help to start a business.
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw Redevelopment of former industrial and underdeveloped sites into business hubs.
    Laxer, Michael Build new infrastructure and transit to stimulate the economy. Implement municipal minimum wage of $15/hour.
    Letonja, John Hire Torontonians to do infrastructure work.
    Moulder, Peggy There is economic value in cultural heritage buildings. Waterfront, cultural heritage, community college, and employment lands can create jobs.
    O'Callaghan, Sean Provide incentives to private companies for job growth.
    Searle, Dave Lower taxes. More commercial units in condo developments.
    Sheppard, Everett A larger Personal Support Worker program for disabled and seniors.
    Sysak, Robert Use the approach took as Executive Director of the West Queen West BIA to bring business and employment to a ward.
    Vella, Tony Any new development must incorporate business with increased employment.


  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ Supports electrification of CN lines for light rail transit. Build the most economical service delivery model that moves the most people.
    James, Ruthmary Puts blame on Mayor and Councillors who did little to improve transit.
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw Subways, a regional transportation system, and the adoption of smart technologies. Sustainable funding from provincial and federal governments.
    Laxer, Michael Use dedicated revenue streams to fund transit expansion with the goal of free transit.
    Letonja, John Implement a city of Toronto lottery. Let companies buy streetcars and subways. Get rid of Metrolinx and let the city make its own transit decisions.
    Moulder, Peggy Use funding options from Metrolinx study and figure out a reasonable configuration. All proposals should be reviewed at public hearings, voted on by community boards, with a written report submitted to City Council.
    O'Callaghan, Sean Would need to review current transit services first.
    Searle, Dave Utilizers of a service should bridge the gap between municipal, provincial, and federal funding. Service quality and frequency of streetcars and buses need to improve.
    Sheppard, Everett Remove streetcars and put more buses on the streets. Future transit should be underground.
    Sysak, Robert Dedicated tax for transit funding. Don't re-open decisions once voted on.
    Vella, Tony Short term: buses. Long-term: subways. Participation from all three levels of government for a separate transit fund. Use Section 37 funding for additional revenue.


  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ The whole dynamic has to be changed away from current adversarial relationship. Listen to the staff and city workers and not consulting firms.
    James, Ruthmary Only give the rate of inflation for wages.
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw City must provide support for employees to become more innovative and effective.
    Laxer, Michael City workers deserve fair and regular wage increases and benefits.
    Letonja, John New hires should work as contractors. Get out of the business of pensions.
    Moulder, Peggy Considering number of employees and the salaries they are paid in times of unemployment, everyone should be reasonable and fair.
    O'Callaghan, Sean Do not offer any increase to workers greater than the cost of living.
    Searle, Dave Give unionized employees job security in exchange for reasonable contract settlement without costly arbitration.
    Sheppard, Everett City labourers should not be paid higher than average private equivalent positions.
    Sysak, Robert The Council's budget goals should be the driving force behind the negotiations.
    Vella, Tony An increase must make sense and be affordable to taxpayers.


  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ No
    James, Ruthmary Yes, for example, in building sports facilities.
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw Yes
    Laxer, Michael No
    Letonja, John Yes, for example, on TTC and garbage collection.
    Moulder, Peggy Will consider with careful scrutiny to protect public interest.
    O'Callaghan, Sean Developers should set aside profits or units for affordable housing.
    Searle, Dave Yes, particularly with commercial space near new transit stations.
    Sheppard, Everett Yes, in essential utilities to bring the costs of these to affordable rates
    Sysak, Robert Will consider if there are benefits to city


  • Candidate Response
    Ford, Russ A councillor that is responsible and visible. Commits to hold office hours and public meetings.
    James, Ruthmary Bring back Police Services 21 Division. Highway traffic gridlock.
    Jankielewicz, Miroslaw Lack of trust in elected officials. Also, lack of safety, congestion, pollution, poor transit, unplanned urban development.
    Laxer, Michael Waterfront West LRT plan and free transit.
    Letonja, John Use referendums and a new website so residents can tell councillor what to do.
    Moulder, Peggy Transportation – re-instatement of the Long Branch streetcar, a new GO station for Humber Bay, and fully connected bicycle routes.
    O'Callaghan, Sean The disconnect between the city and residents.
    Searle, Dave Irregularity of 501 streetcar scheduling. Infrastructure upgrades for walkways.
    Sheppard, Everett A lack of community spirit
    Sysak, Robert Transit, sewage, traffic, roads, daycare especially with new condo developments.
    Vella, Tony Ensure tax dollars are spent wisely.

 

The full responses

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    In general,I do not support simplistic solutions or formulas like this. I wish I could tie my personal expenses to inflation but I cannot.  If the furnace blows I have to find the money to fix it no matter what.   If the city has needs that must be addressed it would be irresponsible not to address them.  I favour an open and transparent budget process.  So residents can see who voted for what and why.  Then it is up to the residents to voice either their support of disapproval.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    I would be open to finding savings. I think we have an obligation to do that but given the results of the core services review I am extremely doubtful that there are any significant savings to be found.  Currently the city is saving money by job gapping.  All that does is delay the functioning of the city. Service  cuts are not on the table for me.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    Less councillors would likely reduce the time of council meetings but that is a big price to pay.  Council is already perceived by many especially in the suburbs as being too remote.  We need to strengthen citizen engagement not take steps to reduce it.  People want more access to their political representatives not less. If a councillor is doing the job they should be doing,there is more than enough work.  So I support keeping council at its current size.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    No I do not support contracting out.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    I believe the land transfer tax brings in about $350 million.  I cannot see how we can afford to eliminate it.  If you do that you will have to increase property taxes.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    First, we have to stop rezoning industrial lands to residential.  That is just an invitation for owners to close plants and build condos. We need to make Toronto attractive to people who are looking for a place to do business.  Grid lock is a major impediment.  Your staff have to be able to get to work on time.  So we need to make Toronto a place that employers want to come.  That will involve considerable public investment.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    Yes we need investment in public transit.  I support the electrification of the CN lines for the purpose of running light rail transit on it.  We have the rails, let’s use them.  You cannot build subways in areas other than those with high density otherwise the operating costs will exceed revenues.  We need to build the most economical service delivery model that moves the most people. I am not sure if the process is bad or is it the level of political interference in the process that has resulted in the current level of inertia?  Clearly we need a transit plan that can withstand political postering.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    We need to change the whole dynamic that  has been created.  We need to move away from the current adversarial relationship between the city and its unions and replace it with a completely different process.  The city and its unions need to develop an effective partnership which is in contrast to the current state of affairs. Every city worker I know can tell me of ways the city can operate more efficiently.  Staff know the issues.  So rather than hire some big management consulting firm, the city needs to listen to the people that actually do the work.  They need to listen to its own staff.  But they won’t do that because of how poisoned the relationship has become between the city and its unions.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    I am not aware of any.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    From  my canvassing the number one issue seems to be the need for a councillor to truly represents the community.  Specifically someone who responds to constituent concerns, holds community meetings and raises ward issues at city hall. In short, the current councillor is not invisible.  I will be very visible both in my community and at city hall.  I will have office hours in the ward, hold public meetings and actively address the concerns of residents.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Yes, I support a property tax cap, no greater than the rate of inflation. We must make sure that our seniors still living their homes can afford to keep the house.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    Cap all Councillors, Mayors Salary to the rate of inflation. All City  Workers most be paid re rate of inflation. I realize they are Unionized, but it must be done. The majority of workers these days are not making what they are. Stop buying umbrella”s,concrete put in @ Queens Quay, I believe they purchased 6 or 7 $30,000.00 each, what a waste of money. We must look after the taxpayers money wisely, as they work so hard for it.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    City of Toronto continues to grow @ grow. I do not support reducing the size of Toronto City Council. Keep the same # of Wards. The problem is the that at the Council Meetings open to the public, the councillors get up & talk to each other, they are on cell phones, leave, some come back, others don’t. What are we paying them for? They are paided by the Citizens of the City of Toronto, act professional and sit down & do your work.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Yes, I would support contracting out garbage collection east of of Yonge St.. We in Etobicoke have had contract garbage collection for some time now. We must cut costs.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    Yes, I would eliminate the “Municipal Land Transfer Tax” for sure.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    We need to get our manufacturing back from the U.S. & Oversea. We certainly lost a lot re Free Trade.  We still have land available & new offices being built they could move into. Get more Hi-Tech jobs too.  We have so many people come from out of town, immigrants who can”t find jobs. Help them start a business.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    This is a million dollar question. The issue with regards to Transit should have been looked at, focused on the future, with the Mayor & Councillors prior to 2014. We have had Mayors/Councillors who did nothing, look at the road situation. What a terrible mess. I was told that on the Lakeshore streetcar line, a person I know had to wait 45min. at the Humber Loop waiting for a Streetcare to take her to the Long Branch Loop. Thats a problem.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    Be tough and give only the rate of inflation for wages. Look also at benefit pkg., & number of sick days.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    Yes I see opportunity for public sector/private partnership re the City of Toronto. Building facilities re sports for the poor sector of society. Building Cente for a number of activities……. The private sector would have it named after the private partner.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    “Top issues, concerns in Ward 6″

    1) Police-need 21 Division back, been closed for a number of years. Population growth, re housing, condos… 22 has too large of an area to patrol. Issues concerning break-ins, quite a few.

    2) Taxes-house

    3) Highway grid lock

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Yes

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    A full review of city operations, expenditures, return of investment and other analyses are required to properly address this question.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    Yes, reducing the size of City Council is part of my platform, but I need to emphasize that reduction by itself will not improve its effectiveness. We also have to look at how the city works and operates as well as the skills and roles of City Councillors that are required to better serve the needs of Toronto in the 21stcentury. I’m also in favour of term limits for councillors to encourage ongoing influx of top talent and ideas.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Yes. I’m for a fair and open tender process.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    Eliminating it. The city must work towards developing a new relation with the provincial and federal governments to ensure there is sustainable funding for Toronto. At the same time, the City must become more efficient.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    We need a comprehensive strategy for economic and social development that includes all levels of government. We have to plan for the future. My vision for Ward 6 is the redevelopment of former industrial and underdeveloped sites into business hubs that will provide employment to local communities and beyond.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    In my view, the mayoral candidates’ transit proposals fall short of what the city of Toronto needs. We need leadership and a bold vision to create a transit strategy that can move us forward into the future and at par with other metropolis. One that includes subways, is integrated with a regional transportation system and includes the adoption of smart technologies. Transit in Toronto cannot be looked at in isolation. It will require sustainable funding involving the provincial and federal governments.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    My advice for the team is to work with labour unions to ensure that the city continues to improve on service delivery and adopts best practices. The City must also provide the support and the right platform for all employees to become more innovative and effective.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    I favour public-private partnerships; one that is based on a clear set of rules and regulations to protect the interest of the public and private investors. Partnerships can happen anywhere.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    Residents have shared with me a number of issues impacting their daily life and communities, from lack of safety, to congestion, pollution, and poor transit, to unplanned urban development. One of the things that consistently comes up is residents’ disillusion with how the City is run and lack of trust in elected officials. Residents I talked to agree that we need change and we must focus on the future that requires a vision and a long term strategy to place Ward 6 and the City on the right path.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    No. This is a terrible idea given the many programs and infrastructure needs facing the city. I do, however, support mitigating property tax hikes by working for the implementation of a city progressive income tax, creating a property surtax on the luxury homes of the wealthy and through the imposition of road tolls on non-residents entering the city by car, among other things.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    I do not regard this as a priority. Rob Ford’s gravy train turned out to be a myth, as I predicted in 2010, and searching out so-called “waste” really usually means cutting programs.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    No. Reducing the size of City Council means reducing political representation and power for Torontonians and our diverse local communities and neighbourhoods. Why would anyone support this?

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    No. To quote my campaign website:

    A fundamental part of the right wing austerity agenda is to make public services private. Eventually they would like to see all government privatised and run for the profit of corporations and Bay St. instead of for the needs of the community. They want to drive down wages and make the people pay for what should be free services.
    If elected to council I will fight not only against the further privatization of any public services, including garbage collection, but also to put back into public hands all services that have been privatized.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    I support it.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    We need a job creation plan centred around the building of new infrastructure and transit (both of which would create many new, good-paying jobs), new city programs and services and the stimulus to the local economy that would result from bringing in a municipal minimum wage of $15 an hour and a Living Wage Ordinance. Workers, unlike the well-to-do and the wealthy, spend most of their income on food, services, entertainment, etc and do so in their local communities.

    The is no better job creation stimulus plan than living wages for all!

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    I believe in using dedicated revenue streams such as the ones listed above to fund transit expansion as well as a universal fare reduction strategy with the goal of free transit as exists in Tallinn, Estonia. I will fight to get the province and federal government to pay their fair share of this, in part by diverting funds used to subsidize car usage.

    I also believe that LRTs provide better service for far less money for most (though not all) neighbourhoods and I would support reverting to the original plan for a Scarborough LRT.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    I am opposed to the disgraceful race-to-the-bottom wage cutting agenda of Bay St. City workers work hard and deserve fair and regular wage and benefit increases. No one in the community benefits when wages are cut and money is taken out of the economy.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    No.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    Transit. As Councillor I will work to bring back the Waterfront West LRT plan for our community and for an affordable transit fare agenda for the TTC whose goal would be free transit.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Yes I do.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    I do not know I did not deal with the city budget but I am sure there is allot of ways in the budget to find savings.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    Yes. Only if the people have a say in a referendum in city hall they are the tax payers they should have a say on city issues.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Yes. The city should be our own contractors we would save allot of money cutting out the middleman on projects that the city has.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    Yes. I do.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    We will do our own infrastructure work, we will hire Torontonians that want to work.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    On funding we can start a new city of Toronto lottery, and we can sell Toronto made wines, beers and spirits that would taste better then any other one on the market. sell T shirts of Toronto that is done by the city. The city can buy T shirts for a 1 dollar and sell them 5 dollars and on other products that the city can generate money. Plus any companies that want to participate can buy there own streetcars or subway and advertise there name on its transportation or rent cheap advertising space on the transportation so everyone can afford to place an ad on the T.T.C.    I can show them how to do that at least I am thing on how we can make money Plus I want to do an experiment that the city will make money without the tax payer support of funding money.

    On transit change, we can build cheaper infrastructure and make more transit lines and faster service plus we can get rid of metro links which they are dictating what to do and buy for this city which is costing tax payers money metro links have to be paid to, we do not need a middleman to tell us what to do. The city of Toronto can make there own customize streetcars and subways and buses that we can and will save tax payers money and create jobs in Toronto.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    Keep the labour people as they are. If there is a restructuring the people can be trained on new jobs but if they do not want the position they will be laid off. And on new hires the people will work as contractors as the city is getting out of the business on handling pensions . The people can find institutions to handle there money.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    Yes I do on T.T.C. and on garbage the city can save money  and make money at the same time one mans garbage is another mans gold we can make products from garbage.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    I will start a new referendum so people will tell me what to do at city hall on major issues.

    I will also build a website so all the people in my community in Ward 6 they can post their link on the website, so if the people wants to have a garage sale or post jobs, or need a handyman or a women to work for you, or find shops and stores, plus need community information on activities and programs, and services.  And let the people know what is happening in the community on anything an everything  I will post it on the website. I want the people to participate so they do not have to go outside of the community if they want, to do something or buy something.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Yes.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    Toronto is now the 4th largest city in North America, after Mexico City, New York and Los Angeles.  New York City (NYC) provides a good city management model for comparison.  For example, the NYC has 235 positions in the Planning Department with plans to reduce staff, whereas the City of Toronto Planning Department has more than 300 positions with plans to add more staff.

    The NYC Planning Commission reviews and provides NYC Council with recommendations on nearly 500 public and private development applications each year.  NYC planning processes are streamlined, democratic and efficient.  The performance of the City of Toronto Planning Department does not match that of New York City, and major legislative and management reforms need to occur, which will result in financial efficiencies.  This exercise of comparison with New York City and other jurisdictions needs to be continued.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    New York City (NYC) has 8.3 million people and 51 City Councillors.  Toronto has 2.6 million people and 43 City Councillors.  Proportionally, Toronto is clearly “top-heavy”.

    Each Toronto City Councillor is allocated more than $450,000 (2013 budget) annually in the City budget for a total of $19.7 million for 43 Councillors.  They would like to increase the number of Councillors.  The question is, will increasing the number of Councillors (more of the same) and related costs provide substantial, or incremental, improvement in management for the City?  The answer is “incremental”, at best.

    The solution is to reform City management by creating Community Districts and Community Boards, based on the New York City model.  You can then create 23 Community Districts based on the Provincial Ridings’ boundaries, with Community Boards, each having a City Councillor and up to 50 citizen members on their Community Board.

    The 23 Community Boards will be funded by the $9.2 million re-allocated from the elimination of 20 Councillors, who will be replaced by 1,150 citizens on Community Boards, to hold public meetings, and to subsequently provide information and recommendations to City Council on all City matters.

    This will result in vastly improved and inclusive public consultation, efficiency in the flow and exchange of information, identification of further options and solutions to problems, better oversight and management of city operations within communities, and obtaining far more benefit from the current expenditures for Toronto City Councillors.  To review draft legislation for Toronto Community Boards, see: www.peggymouldercampaign2014.com.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Which communities will be affected by this proposal?  With Community District Boards in place (as discussed in #3 above), meetings should take place within the affected communities to discuss the pros and cons, and find out from the residents, who are very knowledgeable about the physical layout of their neighbourhoods, what they think will work and what may not work.

    With Community Boards in place, all information is provided on the proposals at public meetings; minutes of the public meetings are recorded; the Community Boards of the affected communities then take a recorded vote and provide a written recommendation to City Council on the proposal.  This is how all subject matters affecting citizens and their neighbourhoods should be handled.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    Yes, I will support reducing it.  If the City is relying on this Tax for general operations, then other funds will have to be found to replace this source of funding.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    Communities need to consider and build on the attributes within their communities which can attract business and new jobs.  In South Etobicoke, we have the waterfront, cultural heritage, a community college, and employment lands which can all be levered to attract tourism, visitors and new business.

    We need to reform City government so that our community visions are not thwarted by City Councillors and support staff at Toronto City Hall, who, for example, often dictate demolition of our cultural heritage buildings because they cannot recognize the economic value.

    We also have the PanAm Games in 2015 which will put Toronto in the spotlight.  We all will need to put our best foot forward and promote Toronto as a city of opportunities.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    There are two current detailed reports on transit:  the Metrolinx Investment Strategy and the Transit Investment Strategy Advisory Panel Report, each recommending various funding options for transit.  The funding from these options is to be dedicated to transit and for no other use:

    (a) capped increases to gas and fuel taxes from 0.5-0.10cents/L

    (b) a modest increase in Corporate Income Taxes

    (c) transfer of a portion of the HST on gas and fuel

    (d) increase Development Charges to fund transit

    (e) pay-for-parking at transit stations

    (f) use of municipal borrowing capacity and debt at a debt-to-revenue ratio of 2.5 to 1, and applied to debt retirement upon completion of projects

    (g) federal government investment.

    I would support some reasonable configuration of any of these funding options.  We cannot get the City moving without funding.

    The City has requested changes to the Metrolinx Board to include municipal and citizen representation, and greater consultation with the GTHA municipalities.

    Proposals concerning transit and funding should also be reviewed at public hearings within (23 proposed) Toronto Community Districts, with minutes of the meetings recorded, and proposals subsequently voted on by the Community Boards, with a written report to City Council to form part of the public record on transit and transit funding.  These public meetings would include teams of City, TTC and Metrolinx staff assigned to the particular Community District to provide information and participate in the discussions.

    In our Ward 6, a draft transit proposal has been created by one of our residents, Paul Chomik, P.Eng. following many resident discussion groups over the years, and forwarded to the TTC Chair, TTC General Manager and Metrolinx, identifying areas for improvement and expansion of services for public transit in our neighbourhoods.  “Big Ideas” from our citizens and communities must be encouraged and discussed at the Community level through Community Boards, and then elevated to City Council once the “Big Idea” is supported by the Community Boards.  New York City has benefited from Community Boards for the last 45 years.  Toronto is a half-century behind with respect to democratic and efficient government.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    The City of Toronto employs 35,000 people:  20,000 full-time and 15,000 part-time.  The remaining 2.6 million residents pay their salaries, which are generous in these times when there is widespread unemployment.  I would kindly ask that everyone be reasonable and fair.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    Too often P3’s prove to be more costly to taxpayers by 15% on average than with traditional procurement methods.  This has been the case with Presto, eHealth and ORNGE.  Studies show that the Provincial Government has overpaid on 28 P3 projects by about $1 billion, with no real idea of the risks they may be assuming (Siemiatycki-Farooqi-2012).

    Governments have the resources to hire appropriately experienced lawyers and professionals who can create and review contracts that protect the public interest.  Clearly, City politicians and support staff have a responsibility to ensure all contract proposals, P3 or otherwise, are carefully scrutinized by appropriate professionals to protect the public interest, and to ensure that citizens are receiving good quality products and services at a fair price.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    A recent poll of our area identified transportation as the top issue for residents in Ward 6.  As noted in #7 above, I support a draft plan for transit prepared by one of our residents, Paul Chomik, P.Eng. for South Etobicoke in response to residents’ concerns.  Important transportation issues to be addressed are:

    • Re-instatement of the Long Branch 507 streetcar to Dundas West Subway Station will connect residents more quickly to the subway system and avoid the traffic congestion experienced with the streetcars on Queen St West to Yonge St
    • A new GO Station for Humber Bay and a Humber Loop Transit Hub
    • Bicycle lanes and cycle tracks are required for the safety of cyclists and to create fully connected bicycle routes in South Etobicoke and throughout the City of Toronto

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    I absolutely believe that there should be a property tax cap as there are many people in the area who are on fixed incomes.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    We need to cut back on non-essential items. Secondly, when contracts are awarded, companies must stay within their given price, there are no overages. A review of the management structure within the City of Toronto programs is reviewed to determine if there is duplication of service at the higher levels of management.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    Yes, I believe that we should be able to cut the council in half to equal 22. I believe that a smaller quorum can accomplish more, this would save the City over 2 Million dollars annually.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    I live in the former City of Etobicoke and we had outsourcing of garbage for many years. We have had continual service and it has been proven to be a cost savings.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    In an ideal world the Land Transfer tax would be eliminated however it generates too much revenue for the City but I would support a reduction.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    I would work with companies in the private section and offer incentives to promote job growth in our community.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    I am currently not a transit user as my job requires me to travel, I would be interested in reviewing the current services and making sure the necessary funds are being put towards the areas that need it most.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    The City Councillors should take the lead and not accept any increase to their salaries. I would suggest that we do not offer any increase to the workers that would be greater than the cost of living.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    These developers should be asked to set a side a percentage of their profits or units to be used towards the construction or refurbishing of affordable housing.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    In talking to the people in ward 6, the biggest issue is a disconnect between the city and its residents. I would have an open phone and door policy with my constituents and would encourage them to meet with me to discuss their issues and how we can resolve them.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Absolutely! With a “tax freedom day” mid-year there is no appetite for taxpayers to pay a penny above the Statistic’s Canada inflation rate for that would give folks less disposable income transcending to job losses and hampering prosperity.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    Prioritizing transit funds over expensive sports complexes, suspension damaging speed bumps, ritzy brick intersection side walks, and privatization where union’s don’t work with the city -for example new agreements bringing in new personel at City Departments at a lower compensation freeing up funds to eleviate transit gridlock. We always hear’ “well in this or that region police or firefighters earn more”; however, compared to neighbouring New York State municipal employees Toronto’s personel are well compensated. Scrutinizing crime in Toronto and when on decline accordingly have it reflected in the large police services budget for that would be prudent.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    I sense their is an inadequate consensus on Council to cut the number of councilors in our rapidly expanding city; however, would certainly not agree with any increase in councillors as we see happening with M.P.’s in the House of Commons. Candidly, I doubt a reduction would serve the City well as councillors are on the front lines of representation and halfing councillors size as has been suggested would not be sound policy when so many are immigrating to our great city every year.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Without question, lets contract out garbage, and any department where evidence from other municipalities that took such initaitives shows potential savings over the status quo.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    Unlike Councilor Grimes, I did not support it although it now seems to be gaining momentum as a “revenue tool” (let’s call a tax a tax) as Premier Wynne calls them outside of Toronto bring us to an equilibrium with neighbouring municipalities. Mayor Ford’s reign has brought us unprecedented residential development in Toronto and I certainly wouldn’t want to see all those construction jobs axed by spiralling transfer tax fees and development levies that I believe Olivia Chow as Mayor would unleash.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    Simple economics, lower taxes = greater disposable income for products and services accelerating job growth.  The O.M.B.  and the City requiring more commercial units in new condo developments would certain help and objecting to the re-assignment of commercial business properties to residential units where the areas have insufficient local retail space to meet the demands of a growing population.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    I am a regular TTC bus, streetcar, and subway commuter, yet also enjoy the liberty of travel afforded by my automobile, and believe the utilizers of a service should pay for it and bridge the gap between provincial, federal, and municipal transit procurements.  A federal government going into surplus may be instrumental helping with Toronto’s overdue transit infrastructure modernization granted that it is a preferred destination in Canada for many immigrants..  Service quality needs to improve when TTC bus and streetcar schedules at the Humber Loop for example show frequency of every 10 minutes when streetcars and buses are often a 1/2 hour or more apart and then two streetcars following each other with the second one empty is an example of waste or poor coordination of drivers.  If you want to increase ridership you can’t have people standing outside getting frostbite because of these irregularities.  Police prioritization of clearing-up accidents blocking TTC rail lines and of tagging and towing vehicles for example in the winter along Queen Street where with plowed snow piles many motorists actually leave their vehicles at a proximately from the curb where they obstruct passage of streetcars -this has got to change!

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    There are limits to what government can tax, spend, and borrow as even N.D.P. Premier Bob Rae admitted; therefore, give unionized employees job security in exchange for reasonable contract settlements without costly arbitration as B.C. Premier Clark did with the teacher’s unions.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    Indeed I do, where developers wish to develop on, near, or adjoining municipal transit projects where they will thrive and be a partner in new transit stations, where we can build commercial rental spaces in the system that generate revenue why not welcome those opportunities.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    The irregularity of the 501 Streetcar scheduling must be addressed!  The narrow walkway at the Humber Loop Tunnel over to the Sobey’s Shopping centure inhibits pedestrian access to these business as it is difficult to manouver through it from Humber Bay Shores rampantly growing condo developments for those with grocery carts, walkers or wheelchairs, and babycarriages where there is simply no room for passage in this over 1/2 century old “rusty-railed walkway”.  This is an example of infrastructure upgrades that would accelerate commerce in our community.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Absolutely, I support property tax capping without any increase if at all possible.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    I believe there is a rather large amount to be saved in office and councilor expenses.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    Yes, I believe if there are councillors continually not present to vote on issues then these councillors are not a necessary part of the Toronto City Council.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Yes, contracting out garbage collection has improved the collection by being much timelier and less costly. I believe the same could be accomplished by contracting out mail delivery, and then mail may actually be delivered within two business days between major cities as well as within the GTA itself.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    Yes, I believe that the Municipal Land Transfer Tax is way too high, if it is possible to eliminate it completely that would be the perfect solution.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    If excess taxes can be found by cutting back on administrative and councilor expenses, then there should be a much larger Personal Support Worker program for our disabled and seniors.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    I would remove the archaic streetcars for safety reasons as well as easing the traffic congestion. The excess funds from the running and maintenance of the streetcars can be put into more buses on the streets until the subways can be built. Yes, the current transit planning process is not viable for a city the size of Toronto. The new streetcars are a ridiculous and costly mistake as they will be no different in running and maintenance costs as the current streetcars. The future transit should be underground as above ground is too congested.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    The city labourers should not be paid any higher than the average private equivalent positions.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    Yes, essential utilities, i.e. Hydro, Gas, and Water; to bring the cost of these utilities to affordable rates.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    The lack of community spirit is the biggest concern. People need more family and musical street events and neighbourhood watch promotion.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Yes I do support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    In order to find significant savings in the current budget the Police Budget will need to be addressed. At $1.1 billion and 11.3% of the City’s Operating Budget, changes need to be made.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    No I do not support reducing the size of Toronto City Council because I do not believe it will improve how council operates.Bringing in term limits will improve how council works, 2 terms for the Mayor and 3 terms for councillors.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    Yes I will support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street. If it can be shown that contracting out other services will save the city money than that’s what we will do.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    I do support in the gradual elimination of the Municipal Land Transfer Tax.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    As executive director of the West Queen West BIA (WQW), I have demonstrated that even with a limited budget, you can bring prosperity and jobs to an area. In fact Vogue magazine declared WQW the 2nd most happening neighborhood in the World.With the work that I have done, with businesses, residents, building owners, tenants, artists, the City, and the list goes on, WQW has developed into an area that has almost no vacancies, we have brought business and employment to WQW. For Toronto to prosper its neighborhoods need to prosper.It took long hours, hard work, commitment and an ability to bring folks with different political agendas together, but in the end we were able to highlight ourstrengths; the areas strengths; and we used those strengths to bring success to the WQW. To bring employment to an area, a ward, and a city, takes a certain set of skills, and those are skills that I have proven that I posses

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    Transit funding needs a consistent and reliable funding source, and that means a dedicated tax.I believe that once council votes a transit decision, it should not keep getting re-opened in order to make changes.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    The Council’s budget goals should be the driving force behind the negotiations.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    If it can be shown that there would be benefits to the city than we should look at them.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    The top concern(s) for Ward 6 residents are transit, sewage, traffic, roads, day care and all the rest of what makes up our infrastructure. With all the new condo development the infrastructure in Ward 6 is being stretched to its limits.In order for Ward 6 to get all the work that needs to be done; actually done, you need to make those points at council meetings. You cannot be absent from council almost a third of the time. I will be at council to make sure Ward 6 concerns are heard and dealt with.

  • 1. Do you support a property tax cap ensuring future hikes are no greater than the rate of inflation?

    Yes! Citizen tax dollars need to be respected. Tax increases need to make sense. Proper planning and informed decisions will help reduce wasteful spending.

    2. Where, specifically, do you advocate finding savings in the current city budget?

    Freezing Councillors’ wages for a few years.

    3. Do you support reducing the size of Toronto City Council?

    I believe at this point council size should remain the same.

    4. Will you support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street?

    I have received positive responses about our current, private garbage collection system. I would support contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge Street.

    5. What are your thoughts on the Municipal Land Transfer Tax – will you support reducing it or eliminating it?

    I do not like the tax! I would be willing to consider reducing a portion of the Municipal Land Transfer tax to help first time home buyers.

    6. Toronto’s unemployment rate is much higher than the provincial rate. What are your ideas to create job growth in Toronto?

    I would insist that any new development incorporates new businesses with increased employment.

    7. It seems City Council has been debating public transit forever with little results to show. How would you fund new transit projects to ease congestion for everyone? Do you feel we need to change the current transit planning process?

    I personally like a short term plan of adding additional bus service and in long term having subways installed. I would seek participation from all levels of government to create a separate fund for transit. I would even use Section 37 funding for additional revenue.

    8. Labour negotiations will be a big part of the next council term. What advice do you have for the city’s negotiating team to get the best deal for taxpayers?

    Be fair to everyone involved. An increase must make since and must be affordable to the taxpayers.

    9. Do you see opportunities for public-private partnerships (P3s) involving the City of Toronto? Where, specifically?

    Yes! For example, study the feasibility of using of our waterfront by creating a water taxi service using public and private partnership to help reduce traffic congestion.

    10. What is the top issue of concern for residents in your ward? What will you do as Councillor to address the issue?

    Ensuring our precious tax dollars are spent wisely.